JURA & SAVOIE

LANGUEDOC-ROUSILLON & CAHORS

PROVENCE & CORSICA

RHONE VALLEY

CAYUSE VINEYARDS

Christophe Baron

The story began in Champagne (France), where Christophe Baron worked with his father and grandfather at the centuries-old Champagne house, Baron Albert. After studying viticulture in Champagne and Burgundy, Christophe realized he wasn’t yet ready to enter the family business and gave in to the urge to travel. An unexpected winery internship brought Christophe to the Walla Walla Valley for the first time in 1993, which reminded him of Châteauneuf-du-Pape in France. Only four years later, Christophe purchased a property and planted his first vineyard in the Stones of this Valley. He called the venture Cayuse Vineyards, after a Native American tribe whose name was derived from the French word “cailloux”—which means “stones”. Now, Cayuse exploits 5 vineyards.

The story began in Champagne (France), where Christophe Baron worked with his father and grandfather at the centuries-old Champagne house, Baron Albert. After studying viticulture in Champagne and Burgundy, Christophe realized he wasn’t yet ready to enter the family business and gave in to the urge to travel. An unexpected winery internship brought Christophe to the Walla Walla Valley for the first time in 1993, which reminded him of Châteauneuf-du-Pape in France. Only four years later, Christophe purchased a property and planted his first vineyard in this valley's stones. He called the venture Cayuse Vineyards, after a Native American tribe whose name was derived from the French word “cailloux”—which means “stones”. Now, Cayuse exploits five vineyards.

The soil, called “Freewater very cobbly loam,” sits atop 10,000 feet or more of pure basalt—a 15-million-year-old bedrock stratum that’s a part of one of the largest areas of basalt lava on the surface of the earth, outside the ocean basins. Because the stony soil offers excellent drainage and limited nutrients, the vines have to struggle to produce their precious fruit. High-density planting forces their root systems to compete and dig deeper for moisture and sustenance, and the heat transmitted by the stones helps the grapes to ripen.

The soil, called “Freewater very cobbly loam,” sits atop 10,000 feet or more of pure basalt—a 15-million-year-old bedrock stratum that’s a part of one of the largest areas of basalt lava on the surface of the earth, outside the ocean basins. Because the stony soil offers excellent drainage and limited nutrients, the vines have to struggle to produce their precious fruit. High density planting forces their root systems to compete and dig deeper for moisture and sustenance, and the heat transmitted by the stones helps the grapes to ripen.

From the very beginning, Cayuse Vineyards has been farmed organically—without synthetic fertilizers, chemicals, insecticides or fungicides. More recently, in 2002, he became the first Domaine in the Walla Walla Valley to fully implement biodynamic farming. We can find chickens, pigs, sheep and cows, apple and cherry trees, tomato and cucumber vines and rows of corn in these vineyards.

From the very beginning, Cayuse Vineyards has been farmed organically—without synthetic fertilizers, chemicals, insecticides or fungicides. More recently, in 2002, he became the first domaine in the Walla Walla Valley to fully implement biodynamic farming. In these vineyards, we can find chickens, pigs, sheep and cows, apple and cherry trees, tomato and cucumber vines and rows of corn.

REGION OF PRODUCTION

Washington - USA


APPELLATION

-

FOUNDED

1993

VINEYARD

19 hectares


CLIMATE

Dry and hot climate, with cool nights


SOIL COMPOSITION

Basalt


VARIETIES GROWN

Syrah, Cabernet-Franc, Cabernet-Sauvignon, Grenache, Merlot, Tempranillo and Viognier


AGRICULTURE

Organic & Biodynamic


WINES OF THE DOMAIN

HORS CATEGORIE Syrah 2016
$523.00
CAYUSE
$306.00
CAYUSE
$220.00
CAYUSE
$193.00
CAYUSE
$193.00
CAYUSE
$220.00

Search